7 of the Most Effective Martial Arts Forms

7 of the Most Effective Martial Arts Forms


From ground-based grappling to standup striking,
here are 7 of the most effective martial arts forms. These tenacious techniques have created some
of the needliest human waypoints on the planet. Number 7: Silat
Roughly translated as ‘fighting skill’, Silat is an umbrella term used in reference
to the various fighting styles that have originated in the Malay Archipelago. Depending on the region, Silat may vary in
name and technique. In Malaysia it is called ‘Silat Melayu’
while Indonesian Silat is referred to under the full name ‘Pencak Silat’. Nevertheless, there are core similarities
between the different forms of the martial art. Its origins rely heavily on oral tradition. Some experts have found a connection between
Silat and the fighting styles of ancient Persia and place its creation somewhere between the
year 600 and 1200 AD. There are some similarities between Silat
and Chinese martial arts such as taking inspiration from nature and the movements of various animals
and building them into the fighting style. Silat Harimau, for example, adapts the movements
of the tiger to suit the needs of comeback. Harimau involves locks and breaks achieved
through fingers in the esophagus, power blows to the head and neck and Pukulan or multiple
striking. Regardless of the region, Silat has a wide
range of takedowns and needly strikes which are commonly delivered from a much lower stance
than other martial arts. The lower stance work also gives Silat great
fluidity as its practitioners can transition very fluently between various facets of fighting,
displaying great adaptability both to open environments as well as closed spaces. Silat is not concerned solely with unarmed
comeback. The arsenal of a seasoned Silat practitioner
would most likely include a wave-like sword called the kris, considered both a spiritual
object and a waypoint, or the karambit dagger. In the hands of an experienced fighter the
karambit is extremely dangerous. The hilt has a ring at the end which the wielder
holds with their index finger that facilitates the underhanded grip on the distinctly curved
blade. The wielder can unleash ad hacks from unusual
angles that are hard to defend against. Number 6: Dambe
Dambe is a viscious form of fighting with roots in Egypt, commonly associated with the
Hausa people of West Africa. Many of the terminology and techniques allude
to wore fair and it was traditionally practiced as a means of preparing the men for wore. Most of those who practiced Dambe were part
of the Hausa butcher caste groups and the tradition developed into a fighting challenge
that commonly took place during the local harvest festival. Nowadays, companies of boxers from various
groups travel to compete in outdoor matches that are accompanied by drumming and a ceremony. Usually, Dambe competitors are fairly matched
in size despite the fact that there are no formal weight classes. The three rounds that make up a match do not
have a time limit and normally end when an opponent’s body, knee or hand touches the
ground, when an official or one of the fighters calls a halt or when there is no activity. To knock an adversary down is referred to
as ‘killing the opponent’. The main waypoint in Dambe is the strong-side
fist, also known as the spear. The strong-side fist is wrapped in a cloth
covered by a tightly knotted cord. Although currently considered to be an illegal
practice, up until recently, fighters would often dip the spear in a mixture of sticky
resin and broken glass. The lead hand, also known as the shield, is
held facing the opponent and may be used to hold or grab. The lead leg is often wrapped in thick chain
and can be used both defensively and offensively. Both the lead leg and the unwrapped leg can
be used to kick. The strikes in Dambe can cause severe damage
and that is why timing is one of the key aspects that fighters must consider in order to avoid
serious injury. Number 5: Vale Tudo
Regarded as precursor of today’s mixed martial arts Vale Tudo is a full-contact comeback
sport, which originated in Brazil, that has very few rules attached to its name which
roughly translates as ‘anything goes’. It originated in the 1920s, when it was showcased
at circuses and shows throughout Brazil. Traditional Vale Tudo is aimed at pure comeback. Practitioners do not wear gloves, there are
no weight classes and head-butts as well as hits to the throat or testicles are allowed. Aside from moves that would be deemed eagle
in most martial arts such as a standing opponent hitting a grounded one, Vale Tudo fighters
may also make use of techniques such as locks, sweeps, grappling and striking, submissions
or takedowns. Much like the modern, better-organized and
safer forms of mixed martial arts, training in Vale Tudo involved a broader understanding
of multiple disciplines as well as intense physical conditioning. It evolved from the side-show brawls into
a finer science but due to its violent and bloody nature, it failed to gain mainstream
support and was slowly forced underground. The UFC or Ultimate Fighting Championship
rose in its place. Even though in the early stages, UFC matches
bared a resemblance to the violence of Vale Tudo, it gradually progressed into a safer
competition with millions of supporters worldwide. Number 4: Muay Thai
Muay Thai was developed in Thailand and its roots can be traced back to the middle of
the 18th century, during the bottles between Siam and the Burmese of the Konbaung Dynasty. Thai folklore tells the story of famous Siamese
fighter Nai Khanomtom, who, after being captured by the Burmese invading trupes, was for east
to fight during a seven-day festival organized by King Hsinbyushin. The Burmese ruler wanted to see how Burmese
boxing would fare against the Muay Boran, which would later become Muay Thai, practiced
by Nai Khanomtom. After using an on bought of various viscious
strikes to lake down ten consecutive opponents, with no rest between the fights, Nai Khanomtom
won his freedom and was given a gift of two beautiful Burmese wives. The king was so impressed with the performance
that he declared that every part of Nai Khanomtom’s body was ‘blessed with venom’. Muay Thai gradually grew in popularity and
became a national sport in Thailand. It gained an international reputation during
the twentieth century after several notable practitioners of other martial arts were defeated
in tournaments by Muay Thai fighters. Also known as the ‘art of eight limbs’
it is a fighting style that enables its practitioners to use their knees, fists, elbows and shins
combined with a series of clinches in full-contact bouts. Aside from training routines that include
many staples of comeback sport fitness such as abdominal exercises, bodyweight resistance
exercises, jump rope or running, Muay Thai fighters also undergo a ruthless conditioning
regimen. Because many of the strikes involve the use
of the shin, they harden the bones through a process called cortical remodeling. By hitting bags filled with sand, dense heavy
bags or even trees they break down the bone tissue in their shins which is then replaced
by a new, harder tissue through a process called ossification. Muay Thai strikes are powerful and explosive
and while many fighters use reach and distance to control the pace of a fight, the hardest
hits take place during the clinch. Unlike Western boxing, Muay Thai fighters
are not separated once they clinch. Instead they employ various stand-up grappling
techniques to deliver punishing knee or elbow strikes from close-quarters. Number 3: Systema
The comeback style practiced by the infamous Russian Spetznaz, Systema focuses on controlling
the most important parts of the opponent’s body, such as the knees, waist, ankles, elbows,
shoulders and neck through critical hits and pressure points. The central principles of this Russian martial
art are based on understanding the laws of anatomy and biomechanics with a focus on exploiting
the natural weaknesses of the human form. It does not have fixed patterns of movement. Training involves drills and sparring that
include grappling, hand-to-hand comeback, firearms training and knife fighting. Systema also teaches its practitioner how
to confront multiple ad hackers some of whom may also be darmed. The body has to be filled with impulsive potential,
effortless movement, endurance and flexibility. The practitioner has to be free from tensions,
in a psychological state that is calm and free from fear, and her, pride or self-pity. Breathing, relaxation and fluidity of motion
are the main focuses of training in Systema. Another important aspect is using the ad hackers
momentum against him. It is a system based on strengthening the
physical, psychological and spiritual sides of an individual. Russia was ad hacked by various countries
throughout its history. From the Mongols to the Huns, each new empty
brought a particular fighting style to the country for sing Russians soldiers to adapt. Thus Systema was born. Although its origins are uncertain some historians
have traced the martial art back to tenth century. Number 2: Krav Maga
Krava Maga is a comeback system developed for the Israeli security noises, Mossad and
Shin Bet, and for the Israel Defense Forces or IDF. It is widely regarded as one of the needliest
martial arts systems ever created borrowing elements from aikido, judo, boxing, wrestling,
muay thai and others. It is widely known for its brutal efficiency. Krav Maga practitioners place great emphasis
on the instinctive nature of comeback, situational awareness and train to confront and overcome
real-world situations. They are taught how to escape jokes and holds
as well as how to deal with ad hackers wielding knives, bats or firealarm. One of the central ideas is to use attentions
and flutal counter-ad hacking techniques to end a fight as quickly as possible, whenever
a physical confrontation cannot be avoided. Krav Maga in its original form took the most
simple and practical elements from other fighting styles and incorporated them into a system
that could be rapidly taught to military conscripts. Some of its basic principles include: simultaneous
ad hacking and pretends, count ad hacking as quickly as possible, continuing to strike
an opponent until they are completely incapacitated, the use of simple and easily repeatable strikes
and targeting the body’s most vulnerable points such as the eyes, face, throat, groin,
solar plexus, knees or fingers. Krav Maga was developed by Hungarian-Israeli
martial artists Imi Lichtenfeld. He used his street fighting experience and
his training as a wrestler and boxer to pretend the Jewish quarter from fascists groups in
Bratislava, Czechoslovakia during the mid-to-late 1930s. After migrating to Israel in the late 1940s,
Lichtenfeld began providing comeback training to what would later become the IDF. Nowadays, several organizations such as the
US Marine Corps and British SAS have begun to teach variations of Krav Maga. Although it has number of core principles,
Krav Maga is a fighting system that continuously grows and evolves always incorporating new
techniques in congruence with the real-life situations. Number 1: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu or BJJ was developed into its current form through the various practices,
experiments and adaptations of Kodokan Judo performed by Helio and Carlos Gracie who passed
their knowledge to their extended family. Today the Gracie name is synonymous with this
martial art. The central concept behind BJJ is that a weaker,
smaller opponent can successfully pretend against a stronger and heavier assailant. In the beginning, to illustrate this point,
the Gracie brothers would accept numerous challenges from practitioners of other martial
arts, many of whom were more massive than they were, and defeat them in open comeback. This was a direct contributing factor to the
creation of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. BJJ places great emphasis on groundwork, leverage
and proper technique. It influenced the perception in the mixed
martial arts world that fighting should only be focused on stand-up positions. BJJ practitioners will often take the fight
to the ground and employ VARIOUS various chokeholds and joint-locks to submit their opponents. Even though in a controlled or competitive
environment fighters release the lock following a tap-out, in the real world BJJ can be used
to break or dislocate bones. Furthermore, the various types of jokes cut
the supply of oxygen to the brain and may result in serious health complications if
not released on time.

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